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March 18, 2012

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twitter.com/bob_ferrapuhls

Beautiful! Nice work as always.

Dave

Thanks, Bob! Appreciate it.

Thyme (Sarah)

Wonderful photos. I hope your parents see the incredible beauty that you are experiencing!

Dave

Thanks, We tried our best. Siem Reap, Chiang Mai and Penang. It seemed like a good contrast.

Liz

"Siem Reap, Chiang Mai and Penang." I think those are my three favorite towns in SE Asia.

I do have one friendly question for you, Dave. ;)

When I was traveling in Thailand/Cambodia I noticed tons of Western tourists. Australians, Brits, etc. I also noticed in the slideshow you took a poignant photo of South Korean tourists resting on chairs.

What's your take on photography when it comes to heavily populated tourist sites like Angkor Wat? Do you ever take photographs of Western passersby? Or do you avoid photographing them altogether because tourists just aren't photographic material?

Sorry for the long question. Thank you!

Dave

Hey Liz - Thanks, that's a good question - basically everyone if 'fair game'at a touristy site like this. I asked the Korean ladies if it was OK to shoot. I liked their fans against the backdrop of 'tourists at Angkor Wat'.

This was all shot for myself. Had it been for a 'lifestyle /travel magazine' I would most definately include 'western tourists' (if they are clearly visable in the frame I would ask them if it is OK to shoot or include them in my edit).

Sometimes I don't want people, as with the first frame, but other times people can create great frames to shoot through and hightlight your subject or to show scale (as is often the case in Angkor Wat). In the end places without people are often just places so finding a way to incorporate them in your story is important. Waiting for the right moment so that they do not distract from the frame is really the key.

thyme (sarah)

Wonderful photo tour. It seems like it was your parent's first time visiting that part of your world. What a photography ripe part of the world for our Western eyes. Thank you!

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